Share this site - Email/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest






Elton John
Uni 73090
Released: August 1970
Chart Peak: #4
Weeks Charted: 51
Certified Gold: 2/17/71

Elton JohnThe major problem with Elton John is that one has to wade through so much damn fluff to get to Elton John. Here, by the sound of it, arranger Paul Buckmaster's rather pompous orchestra was spliced in as an afterthought to flesh out music that had sufficient muscle to begin with, their choirs and Moogs and strings threaten to obscure Elton's voice and piano, everywhere that they appear at least momentarily diverting the listener's attention therefrom. Those acquainted with producer Gus Dudgeon's briliant work with the Bonzos have ample reason to be mightily disillusioned with the good fellow for the excesses he allowed to run rampant here.

But don't be scared away, for so immense a talent is Elton's that he'll delight you senseless despite it all. He's equally affective belting gospely rock and roll raves like "Take Me To The Pilot" and the already much-covered "Border Song" (neither of which one can resist leaping up heatedly to boogie to) in a tuneful snarl and intoning pretty McCartneyesque ballads like "Your Song," "I Need You To Turn To," or "First Episode at Heinton" in a warm, intimate and wonderfully sympathetic tenor. In "No Shoestrings on Louise," a respectful send-up of the Stones' "Dear Doctor," he manages to sound like the perfect synthesis of all the luminaries mentioned above without once removing his tonge from against his cheek. And the orchestra was needed on neither "Sixty Years On" nor "The King Must Die," for on both his voice creates sufficient drama on its own.

A few warranted words on the album's words, by Bernie Taupin. He all too often opts for the consciously poetic/arty where the straightforward would tend to do better. Taupin's definitely his most bearable when, as in "The Greatest Discovery" or "Heinton," he's too busy narrating specific emotions and experiences for us to think about concealing his sentimentality with poetistic tricks. Rock and roll has too few unabashed sentimentalists writing songs as it is: let it all hang out, Bernie.

If we can somehow discover another Elton John and coerce the Move to release their new album in the next few weeks, 1970 may yet escape going down as a not terribly good year for rock and roll.

- John Mendelsohn, Rolling Stone, 11-12-70.

Bonus Reviews!

The British performer/composer comes up with one of the top LP's of the week, both creatively and commercially. His song, "Border Song," now receiving much attention, is featured, along with exceptional, original material such as the ballad beauty, "I Need You To Turn to," and the compelling "Sixty Years On." The superb arrangements of Paul Buckmaster are as creative as the material of John and cowriter Bernie Taupin.

- Billboard, 1970.

A lot of people consider John a future superstar, and they may be right; I find this overweening (semi-classical ponderousness) and a touch precious (sensitivity on parade). It offers at least one great lyric (about a newborn baby brother), several nice romantic ballads (I don't like its affected offhandedness, but "Your Song" is an instant standard), and a surprising complement of memorable tracks. But their general lack of focus, whether due to histrionic overload or sheer verbal laziness, is a persistent turnoff. B

- Robert Christgau, Christgau's Record Guide, 1981.

The first of Elton's 1970 releases (the other being Tumbleweed Connection), it introduced American audiences to his chunky piano, enthusiastic vocals, and the juxtaposition of yearning ballads with all-out production rockers. It was obviously a formula whose time had come. The musicianship is polished and tight; the Gus Dudgeon production precise and complementary, all of which resulted in a massively appealing pop product. John's recorded work has always been notable for its sound quality, and given the vintage of this material, it doesn't sound that bad on compact disc. That doesn't mean that compression and occasional harshness aren't evident; they are, but detailing and dynamics are also improved. B-

- Bill Shapiro, Rock & Roll Review: A Guide to Good Rock on CD, 1991.

Ironically, Elton John's breakthrough album (and U.S. debut) is uncharacteristic of his other work, heavily featuring Paul Buckmaster's dramatic string arrangements. John is never overwhelmed by strings or choirs and turns in some powerful performances. Contains "Your Song." * * *

- William Ruhlmann, The All-Music Guide to Rock, 1995.

Elton John doesn't exactly look like a rock star on the cover of his U.S. debut album. But he does have the tunes, with Paul Buckmaster's orchestrations and Bernie Taupin's llyrics, on piano ballads such as "Your Song" and the enigmatic rocker "Take Me to the Pilot." Elton John has been a rock star ever since.

Elton John was chosen as the 468th greatest album of all time by the editors of Rolling Stone magazine in Dec. 2003.

- Rolling Stone, 12/11/03.

(2008 Deluxe Edition) Elton John was a lot of things -- sideman, session man and flop, with a long tail of failed solo releases, including the 1969 LP Empty Sky -- before 1970's Elton John made him an overnight star. On the new Mercury/UMe/Rocket reissue, the extras actually trump the baroque strings and hippie-gospel chorales that crowded "Sixty Years On" and "Take Me to the Pilot." Sripped-bare demos of nearly every song on the record included on a second CD highlight the '68 Beatles and '58 Jerry Lee Lewis in John's voice and piano. * * * *

- David Fricke, Rolling Stone, 9/4/08.


Amazon.com
Read more reviews, listen to song samples,
and buy this album at Amazon.com.


CD Universe
Prefer CD Universe?
Click here.


GEMM
Or try GEMM's international network
of CD, vinyl and tape dealers.


Time Life Music
Buy unique CD collections at Time Life's
StarVista Entertainment site.


eBay Music
Search for great
music deals at eBay.


The Super Seventies Poster Room
Search for posters of this artist in
The Super Seventies Poster Room.







 Main Page | The Classic 500 | Readers' Favorites | Other Seventies Discs | Search The RockSite/The Web